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Recommended Reading

Delaware Housing Coalition > Resources > Recommended Reading

A Dream Foreclosed

Black America and the Fight for a Place to Call Home

Laura Gottesdiener (Zuccotti Park Press, 2013)

Told through the eyes of four homeowners—a grandmother in Detroit, an entrepreneur in rural North Carolina, a disabled man in Chattanooga, and a mother in Chicago—A Dream Foreclosed presents a people’s history of the U.S. financial crisis and the rise of a people’s movement for economic justice, dignity, and freedom from foreclosure. With power and humanity, Laura Gottesdiener bears witness to the ordinary people organizing their communities to challenge the banks and legal system.

Climbing Mount Laurel

The Struggle for Affordable Housing and Social Mobility in an American Suburb

Douglas S. Massey, Len Albright, Rebecca Casciano, Elizabeth Derickson, and David N. Kinsey (Princeton University Press, 2013)

Under the New Jersey State Constitution as interpreted by the State Supreme Court in 1975 and 1983, municipalities are required to use their zoning authority to create realistic opportunities for a fair share of affordable housing for low- and moderate-income households. Mount Laurel was the town at the center of the court decisions. As a result, Mount Laurel has become synonymous with the debate over affordable housing policy designed to create economically integrated communities.

Independent for Life

Homes and Neighborhoods for an Aging America

by Henry Cisneros (University of Texas Press, 2012)

Do you want to age independently in your own home and neighborhood? Staying home, aging in place, is most people's preference, but most American housing and communities are not adapted to the needs of older people. And with the fastest population growth among people over 65, finding solutions for successful aging is important not only for individual families, but for our whole society. In Independent for Life, former HUD Secretary Henry Cisneros and a team of experts on aging.

In-laws, Outlaws, and Granny Flats

Your Guide to Turning One House into Two Homes

Michael Litchfield (Taunton Press, 2011)

In response to tight times, a remarkably upbeat and widespread change is taking place in households across America. Homeowners are creating second dwelling units—often called in-law suites, mother-in-law apartments, or granny flats. Second units make a lot of sense. They’re perfect for families who want several generations living close by, they enable Baby Boomers to care for elderly parents while respecting their independence, provide private quarters for adult children still at home.

Pocket Neighborhoods

Creating Small-Scale Community in a Large-Scale World

Ross Chapin (Taunton Press, 2011)

Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating Small Scale Community in a Large Scale World introduces an antidote to faceless, placeless sprawl — small scale neighborhoods where people can easily know one another, where empty nesters and single householders with far-flung families can find friendship or a helping hand nearby, and where children can have shirt-tail aunties and uncles just beyond their front gate.

Stuck in Place

Urban Neighborhoods and the End of Progress toward Racial Equality

Patrick Sharkey (University of Chicago Press, 2013)

Under the New Jersey State Constitution as interpreted by the State Supreme Court in 1975 and 1983, municipalities are required to use their zoning authority to create realistic opportunities for a fair share of affordable housing for low- and moderate-income households. Mount Laurel was the town at the center of the court decisions. As a result, Mount Laurel has become synonymous with the debate over affordable housing policy designed to create economically integrated communities.